List of Works available for an art event in Shanghai

Geisha Series:
¤

1-
Blue Fish Geisha

2010
Size:  23.64″ X 31.4″
(60 cm X 80 cm)
Medium: Acrylic on canvas.
¤
¤

2-

Double Happiness (Smoky Hot)
2012
Size: 23.64″ X 31.4″
(60 cm X 80 cm)
Medium: Acrylic on canvas.
¤
¤

3
Storm in a Fish Bowl
2010-2012
Size: 23.64″ X 31.4″
(60 cm X 80 cm)
Medium: Acrylic on canvas.
¤
¤

4
Growing Wings
2011
Size: 23.64″ X 31.4″
(60 cm X 80 cm)
Medium: Acrylic on canvas.
¤
¤

5
Nam Nam
2011
Size: 23.64″ X 31.4″
(60 cm X 80 cm)
Medium: Acrylic on canvas.
¤
¤
Dripping Series:
¤

6
In Wonderland
2011
Size: 23.64″ X 31.4″
(60 cm X 80 cm)
Medium: Acrylic on canvas.
¤
¤

7-
Cosmic Lavender (A Tribute to Pollock)

2010
Size: 23.64″ X 11.81″
(60 cm X 30 cm)
Medium: Acrylic on canvas.
¤
¤
Portrait Series:
¤


8-

Little Girl
2010
Size: 19.68″ X 23.62″
(50 cm X 60 cm)
Medium: Acrylic on canvas.
¤
¤

9-
Glow in the Dark

2010
Size: 19.68″ X 23.62″
(50 cm X 60 cm)
Medium: Acrylic on canvas.
¤
¤

10-
FangFang

2011
Size: 19.68″ X 23.62″
(50 cm X 60 cm)
Medium: Acrylic on canvas.
¤
¤

11-
FeiFei

2011
Size: 19.68″ X 23.62″
(50 cm X 60 cm)
Medium: Acrylic on canvas.
¤
¤

12-
Julie

2011
Size: 19.68″ X 23.62″
(50 cm X 60 cm)
Medium: Acrylic on canvas.
¤
¤

13-
(A Piece Of) Cake

2011
Size: 19.68″ X 23.62″
(50 cm X 60 cm)
Medium: Acrylic on canvas.
¤
¤
Others:

¤

14-
Temple

2012
14.96″ X 20.86″
38 cm X 53 cm
Medium: Watercolor and ink on paper.
¤
¤

15-
Pagoda

2012
14.96″ X 20.86″
38 cm X 53 cm
Medium: Watercolor and ink on paper.
¤
¤


16-
Speaking Mandarin II

2010
Size: 11.6″ X 8.26″
(29.5 cm X 21 cm)
Medium: Color crayons, ink pen, HB pen on paper.
¤
¤

17-
Mr. Bones (Fan in a Club)

2012
Size: 11.6″ X 8.26″
(29.5 cm X 21 cm)
Medium: HB pen on paper.
¤
¤


18-
Tang Bo

2008
Size: 22.04″ X 15.74″
(56 cm X 40 cm)
Medium: HB pen on paper.
¤
¤

19-
Xi’An Kids on the Bund

2009
Size: 15.35″ X 21.25″
(39 cm X 54 cm)
Medium: HB pen and color crayon on paper.
¤
¤

20-
Perfomance Photos

2010
Where What Who:
From a performance with MingMu and Camille Nicolau,
at M120 (Moganshan Lu #120, Shanghai, under demolition).
Photos taken by Jack Zhang,
event called “M120 Re-used” organized by Konstantin Bayer and Suzan Junker.

Wish You Were Here (Oui 是 You Wew Weew’)

WARNING :
This post was originally written in French
and then translated/adapted as best as I could… I.e. it’s full of odds, and over-explicit.
If you have any comment to make, just send it to my Ninja Chipmunk. 😛 !
No seriously, I’ll be glad to hear from you. 🙂
_________________________________

With luv from… Montreal?!

Special thanks to Dominique for being my best postcard pusher ever.
(By the way, the next step would be to work from my own pics…!)

And thanks to Olivia for spending such an awesome artistic afternoon with Ming!
(I want some more!)

Okay, so I’m sharing my little pop-tart series with you guys,
even if choosing the photos is a total nightmare
(golden spray paint is everything but camera-friendly)…
[Plus, this is only a sample,
as some of the cards were posted without any trace of their existence… oh well.]


Castorium

Let’s first go awkward : “Beaver”, in [English] Canadian culture, for what I know,
isn’t just an animal.
(Or yes, it still is… After all.)

In French, it’s “castor”, but it-ain’t-no-beaver, but it is…
“Castor”: it explains the name of that beautiful potion
we use to make out of its glands. (Yeah, we’re that kind of people.)

In New France, it  was believed that Castorium could cure several diseases,
which is… somehow true,
since that our little rodent is technically a furry Aspirin -full of acetylsalicylic acid.
(We thus can conclude
that beavers never suffer headaches,
and to some extent that their species isn’t endangered.)


A few centuries ago, Christians believed in the “Signatures Doctrine”,
i.e. “God has left hints everywhere for humankind to understand how to use His creation”

It’s quite similar to Chinese medicine thinking,
where something looking like a specific organ
might be efficient to heal it -or to maintain it in good health.

So,
for Canadian pioneers,
the beaver’s “fish-like tail” was an indication from God
that it was a good option as a Friday dinner. No worries : it’s seafood.
(What??! -They thought about it just after “making peace” with their neighbor, right?!)
Got the munchies? Bon appétit!


Never Far

(View : Montreal Botanical Garden)
It’s a puppet-theater concept, as sent with the next picture (for a sophisticated dialogue)…


What the??????

Warning. I’m about to swear.
Should I explain that a “seal”, in French, is a “phoque”. It sounds the way you think it does.
A stupid phoque. Completely phoqued up. WTP???


Oh My Tractor

(View : Old Montreal)
Oh my love, oh my tractor, I’ll be tracking you in the snow,
though your so slow,
and so noisy,
that you’ll never be able to hide from me for too long anyway…


Ninja!

Warning. Canadian chipmunks can be real assholes.
“Hey Kung Fu Panda,
noodle-sucker bamboo-licker, no wonder you were born with permanent black-eyes!
Da-da-da-dada, da,
catch me if you can, fatty!”
*GOOOOOOONNG*!!!!


Formula One

I like your race, baby tank…! Or maybe it’s just you :)!

For the two next ones,
you are cordially invited to find the 777 differences.

*
Stadium 1
and Stadium 2


The “Unlucky Hunter’s Stew”

Some [unfortunate] traditional recipe!
I’m serious. Google Jehanne Benoît’s traditional cookbook if you don’t believe me.

I Never had this faaaaamous stew yet,
but I guess we can have it for dessert -after the main course : beaver.
(But not on a Friday, nononono, there’s no “Fish Tale” about that one!)
…Now tell me again that Chinese are weird for eating crayfish
[whatta “calorie-wise” mess]…
Detail, the sticker on the squirrel says “Life is short, eat poutine”. Indeed.
If you live in China and have no idea what “poutine” stands for, go get some at Julie’s. :)!

That will be all for now,
so have a very… (lucky) rodent day (whatever that meant)!

Ming Mu xo

Ming Mu’s Artist Statement

Like all of us, I (we) have more or less 15 personalities.
Okay, let’s say more.

We are currently studying painting and drawing (Concordia University),
but we (like you) come from different backgrounds.
…It just develops various points of view,
though we still have just one pair of eyes (it’s a pity).
Therefore, we are very interested to see throughout yours,
to get under your skin, and feel your heartbeat.

We agree with theories stating that art takes part in life :
we (all of us) are multidisciplinary, and thus,
we are as much eclectic and schizoid as our lives. And so is our “style”.
Hence, we believe that one artist does not equal just one style.

…We love abstraction, figuration, performance art, installations, and so on.
We love creation,
from the inspiration to this magic moment where (good and bad) things are happening.
And we don’t like. We love.

…We are a joyful mess,
using a bamboo brush to paint Geishas on the top of acrylic dripping layers,
or turning ourselves into a canvas (in a white dress waiting to be soaked with life’s colors).
…And sometimes, we even go for traditional art!

Now tell us about you, that’s what we want to know.

MingMing

July 2010: Dripping Perfo at M120 (Photos from Jack Zhang)

On July 18th,
my friend Konstantin Bayer organized a one-day art event
on the site of “M120″ which was an art galleries spot that got demolished this summer.
(Konstantin is an installation artist (and sculptor) from Berlin
who responds a lot to the memories of objects, houses, etc,
therefore the choice of the “diffusion site” was just perfect.)
…Our “one-day art-land” looked like one of these Kurt Schwitters’s “Mertz Construction”.

We were 30 artists presenting our works
-framed, to make a visual clash with that “trashy site”-
and it was such a big deal to hang our stuff up
on the few concrete walls that were still there…

Most of us also did a performance, from electronic noise to 3D projections, dance, etc.
I did one too.
And I showed nine works,
my artist statement was “one artist does not equal one style” (see previous post).

I invited my friend Camille Nicolau
(specialized in marquetry and design, she also paints)
to participate to my “Human Drips Performance” :
I did it before in one of the photo studios in Concordia:
my friend and schoolmate Didier Bellemare took pictures that time,
it was a wonderful collaboration.

So it was all new for me to drag somebody in my delirium to “become a painting”
(we had to be more organized, sync at least just a little, for harmony’s sake).

Preparation of the color mixes: 30 minutes.

I was quite nervous to do it in front of 80 people.
The viewers responded real nicely to our piece,
and before we started offering glasses of paint
(like we usually offer glasses of wine in an art opening),
they begun to “serve themselves” and throw mixed colors at us just like we planed.
The performance lasted 30 minutes, we finished completely soaked,
and washed like we could
-improvising some street-clothed-showering from the tap water of the site
(every old area in China includes a sink in the street, no water in the houses).


“Homage to Graph Street Art”
“Birth in Paint” Offering glasses of paint to the people.
*
That day was a very long one,
my performance “stage” was a pit when I arrived on the site in the morning,
it was 45 degrees outside, we fried under the sun,
I stayed there for 14 hours, it was simply delicious.


*

*

Very special thanks to my friend Jack Zhang [YuFan] (张予帆)
for taking pictures, saving the day a thousand times, etc.
By the way this guy is a “News Fixer” (journalist) daring to [wisely] analyze his country,
which is kinda risky here, his blog is called “Inside the Great Firewall”, have a look :
http://www.insidegfw.com/ .

Geishaz: My Edo Trip (Sample)

“Edo Geishas” with a contemporary “joyfully messy dripping background”…

I make my own combination with pieces of ancient art… but I always change it a lot…
-I never paint the eyes the way they are because they look mean;
-I never paint the nose the way it is (ugly black nostrils);
-I never paint the mouth the way it is because it looks…. disgraceful;
-I mostly don’t keep the “bubble style” of the fingers;
-I change every color, create another kimono, change the hair, etc.

So this is a sample of my “Edo Trip Series”.

Blue Fish Geisha:

Blue Fish Geisha

2010
Size: 31.4″ X 23.64″
(80 cm X 60 cm)
Medium: Acrylic on canvas.
Ming, where is your piece now? In Shanghai, China.
¤

¤
¤
¤
You Have a New Message
:

You Have a New Message

2010
Size: 27.55″ X 35.42″
(70cm X 90 cm)
Medium: Acrylic on canvas.
Ming, where is your piece now? In Shanghai, China.

¤
¤
¤
¤
Mandarin Cherry Blast :


Mandarin Cherry Blast

2008
Size: 31.4″ X 23.64″
(80 cm X 60 cm)
Medium: Acrylic on canvas.
Ming, where is your piece now? In Vichy, France.

¤
¤
¤
¤
Red Moon Waves :


Red Moon Waves

2008
Size: 24″ X 36″
(60,96 cm X 91,44 cm)
Medium: Acrylic on canvas.
Ming, where is your piece now? In Montreal, Canada.

¤

Drawings (Samples)

Here a a few of my drawings.
¤

Speaking Mandarin
¤
¤
¤
¤

Speaking Mandarin II
¤
¤
¤
¤

Tang Bo
¤
¤
¤
¤

Cai Rang
¤
¤
¤
¤

Chess Mates
¤
¤
¤
¤

Small Streets
¤
¤
¤
¤

Ombrella Dripping Self Portrait
¤
¤
¤
¤

Atomic Heart 1
¤
¤
¤
¤

Vanity
¤
¤
¤
¤

Soft Figure